Boijmans Diary 2019

Boijmans Diary 2019

The Body Imagined

  • Author(s):
    Alex de Vries
  • Year:
    2018
  • Language:
    dutch, english
  •  
  • Design:
    Tessa van der Waals
  • Size:
    19 x 22,5 cm
  • ISBN:
    9789069183053
  •  
  • Edition:
    ringband
€ 17,50
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In choosing the theme of corporeality for the 2019 diary, the editors have set themselves quite a task. For Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen’s collection contains so many artworks depicting the human body in one way or another that making a selection was no mean feat.
Man Ray’s Venus Restored, shown on the cover, makes clear that we are constantly redefining the ideal of beauty. By binding an iconic sculpture with rope, he provides a layered commentary on how we relate to the human body in life and in art: we worship it, but we also restrain it.
The 54 artworks in this 71st edition of the diary are barely representative of the museum’s collection as a whole, even though they include masterpieces by Dürer, Michelangelo, Arcimboldo, Rubens, Ensor, Dalí, Van Dongen, Nauman, Sottsass and others. Art is a matter of discovery and rediscovery. That is evident from the work of the seventeenth-century painter Hendrick ter Brugghen, which was highly regarded in his lifetime. But he was quickly forgotten after his death and it was not until around 1950 that the quality of his paintings found renewed appreciation.
Corporeality can be expressed in the disturbing realism of Sylvie Zijlmans’ intimidating photographic work Rananim or in the simple stick figure in A.R. Penck’s Red Man. In these pages we encounter classical academic skill in Jan Gossaert’s The Metamorphosis of Hermaphroditus and Salmacis, and Alicia Framis’s campaign to combat the threat of violence to women’s bodies. We find biting commentary on today’s beauty ideals by Inez van Lamsweerde, and appreciation of physical frailty in Wally Elenbaas’s moving portrait of his wife as a modern Eve.
Painting, sculpture, fashion, furniture, performance and photography: all the creative disciplines tackle the subject of corporeality in their own way. In this respect, art is a mirror in which we can see ourselves.

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